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shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com June 19, 2018 • Page 9 Walz Named New SD Air Guard Noem: Strengthening Tribes Assistant Adjutant General By Staff Sgt. Jorrie Hart 114th Fighter Wing Public Affairs SIOUX FALLS - Brig. Gen. Russ Walz assumed duties as the assistant adjutant general for the South Dakota Air National Guard, during a transfer of authority ceremony at Joe Foss Field in Sioux Falls, June 3. Maj. Gen. Tim Reisch, SDNG adjutant general, presided over the ceremony where Walz assumed authority as the assistant adjutant from Brig. Gen. Joel DeGroot, who served in the position since March 2017. DeGroot will now be the chief of staff, Headquarters, SDANG. Walz is now responsible to the adjutant general for strategic planning, strength management, Airmen readiness and mobilization support of the state's nearly 1,100 Air National Guard Airmen. After the transfer of authority, Walz addressed members of the 114th Fighter Wing. "It's truly an honor to be representing this unit in the new capacity as the assistant adjutant general and it's a big honor to represent the state of South Dakota," Walz said. "It's an honor and blessing to represent the 1,093 men and women who are unbelievable professionals." "I look forward to seeing Airmen in action doing amazing things and being here from the headquarters perspective to help you push your mission," Walz added. During the ceremony, Reisch commented on DeGroot's time as assistant adjutant. "He has done a fantastic job over the last year," said Reisch, "He stepped into leadership right away." Reisch also commented on how DeGroot stepped up as a regional leader for the JDEC (Joint Diversity Executive Committee) nationally, which he stated was an amazing achievement for a new general. Reisch spoke about Walz's leadership by saying, "He's the type of guy people like to work with and work for." Reisch said that the 10 years Walz served as the 114th commander, followed by two years at state headquarters, make him a perfect fit for this job. Prior to taking on this new position, Walz served as director of joint staff, Joint Force Headquarters, SDNG, and SDANG chief of staff. He primarily served as the principal advisor to the adjutant general on all joint issues and policies relating to defense support to civil authorities and homeland defense programs. Walz enlisted in the SDANG in 1980. He later commissioned at the Academy of Military Science in Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1989, earning distinguished graduate honors. He completed undergraduate pilot training at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi. Walz assumed the position of director of joint staff in May 2016, having held previous command positions at the flight, squadron, group and wing levels. He is a command pilot with over 3,700 total fighter hours, including 70 combat hours enforcing no-fly zones over southern and northern Iraq. Big Wins For The American People By Sen. John Thune I can’t think of another period of time while I’ve served in Congress when we’ve been able to put so many points on the scoreboard for the American people. Over the last year and a half alone, despite the historic levels of obstruction we’ve faced from my Democrat colleagues in the Senate, Republicans have achieved numerous legislative accomplishments that will have a positive and lasting effect on the country for generations to come. From tax reform to regulatory reform to reshaping the judiciary, the Republican-led Congress has made the American people’s priorities its priorities. On tax reform – promise made, promise delivered. In just the handful of months since the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act became law, more than 1 million jobs have been created. It’s an important milestone that fulfills a promise Republicans made to the American people when we debated the bill in Congress, and it’s welcome news for American workers. More than 500 companies, including several here in South Dakota, have already passed tax savings on to their customers and employees in the form of pay raises, bonuses, and utility rate reductions. Today, the unemployment rate matches a near five-decade low, and for the first time ever, there are more job openings than there are job seekers in the United States. We’re still in the early stages of this new law, though, and while there’s plenty of good news to share, there’s more yet to come. The Republican-led Congress devoted a significant amount of time to rolling back burdensome Obamaera regulations that were hamstringing growth and opportunity. We used a congressional oversight process that, up until last year, had only been successfully used one time in history. That process, the Congressional Review Act, gives Congress the ability to undo regulations that were implemented by the executive branch. We didn’t use it just once, twice, or even 10 times. We used it a record-setting 16 times. As a result, we provided much-needed relief to businesses and consumers across the country. While Senate Democrats have done everything they can to delay and obstruct the president’s nominees to the executive and judicial branches, we’ve continued to plow ahead, threatening to keep the Senate in session around the clock or over the weekend, if that’s what it takes. Despite the obstruction, in 2017, the Senate set a record for confirming circuit court judges. Today, one-in-eight of all circuit court judges in the United States have been nominated by President Trump and confirmed by this Senate. We also confirmed U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, passed multiple bills to help our veterans, strengthened our military with the greatest investment in 15 years (plus the largest troop pay increase in nearly a decade), combatted opioid abuse, enacted the longest State Children’s Health Insurance Program extension in history, fought sex traffickers, and repealed Obamacare’s individual mandate – the cornerstone of the failed health care law – just to name a few. We’ve accomplished a lot of big things over the last 18 months, but there’s more work to do, including getting a pro-farmer, pro-agriculture farm bill to the president as soon as possible. I look forward to delivering more positive results like these for South Dakotans and the American people in 2018 and beyond. By Rep. Kristi Noem Much of South Dakota’s history is rooted in Indian Country, but sadly, many of the systems designed to help tribal members are failing. From healthcare to education to housing, those who live on reservations are struggling. In recent years, much of the attention has focused on the failing Indian Health System (IHS). Federal watchdog reports have repeatedly documented shocking cases of mismanagement and poorly delivered care. Babies were born on bathroom floors with no doctor present. Facilities were forced to wash surgical equipment by hand, due to broken sterilization machines. Medical personnel were coming to work with certifications that had lapsed. It is inhumane to provide this kind of “care.” I recognize recruiting quality medical and administrative staff is an issue at many IHS facilities, which are often located in extremely remote areas, but I’m confident these challenges can be overcome. I have introduced legislation, for instance, to expand the IHS' existing student loan repayment program in order to attract more and better personnel. It would also cut the red tape that impedes professionals from volunteering at IHS hospitals and clinics and allow administrators to more easily hire good employees and fire bad employees. Moreover, the legislation increases transparency by ensuring reports and plans are completed in a timely manner, enhancing congressional oversight, and expanding whistleblower protections. The bill is one of the most comprehensive IHS reform packages to move through Congress in recent years. It was approved by a key House committee in mid-June, and I’m hopeful we can see it advance through the legislative process in the months to come. Health care, however, is just one of the challenges faced by tribes in South Dakota. Housing continues to be an issue for many. Earlier this year, Sen. Thune, Sen. Rounds, and I put pressure on the Department of Agriculture to expand home ownership opportunities in these areas. This May, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue responded by announcing a new pilot program on tribal lands to assist low-income families in their journey toward home ownership. I am hopeful South Dakota families will be able to take advantage of the program soon. While housing and healthcare provide security, education offers opportunity. Recruiting and retaining good teachers, however, has proven difficult. As such, I’ve introduced legislation in the House to help ease certain financial burdens on tribal schools. I’m optimistic the changes, if enacted, will help communities retain teachers with enhanced employee benefits while also preserving more resources for the classroom. The Native American people enrich South Dakota’s culture and play an important role in the American story, but many are struggling. Whether it’s health care, education, or housing, I’m committed to fulfilling America’s treaty obligations and expanding opportunities within tribal communities. GFP Proposes State Park Firewood Restrictions PIERRE, S.D. – Due to the emerald ash borer being detected in South Dakota, the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks (GFP) Commission approved an emergency measure that no wood may be brought from a quarantined area into the South Dakota state park system. This includes state parks, state recreation areas, state lakeside use areas, state nature areas and state recreation trails. The emergency measure will be effective for up to 90 days. The Commission also proposed to make the emergency measure permanent. The quarantine area, designated by the South Dakota Department of Agriculture, currently includes all of Minnehaha County and portions of Turner and Lincoln County area and will grow if the infestation moves beyond the area. Firewood from out of state is also not permitted. Wood may be brought into the South Dakota state park system if it has a label affixed certifying it as treated for emerald ash borer. For more information on emerald ash borer and how to help slow the spread, visit http://emeraldashborerinsouthdakota.sd.gov/. The GFP Commission will consider the adoption of this proposal on July 11 in Pierre. To comment in person, the public hearing will be held July 11 Pierre at 2 p.m. CDT at the Ramkota Hotel and Convention Center. Individuals can also provide written comments on proposals by sending them to 523 E. Capitol Ave., Pierre, SD 57501, or online at https://gfp.sd.gov/forms/positions/. To be included in the public record and to be considered by the Commission, comments must include a full name and city of AUTO residence and meet the submission deadline of 72 hours before the public hearing (not including the We Supply day of the public hear& Install ing). RON’S GLASS MV Shopper 665-5884 MV Shopper Heavy Duty OPEN HOUSE M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y In Print and Online! • Auto • Home • Commercial 605-665-9841 www.ronsautoglass.com M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y Saturday, June 23 • 10:00-11:30AM 808 12th St., Springfield 2 bedroom, finished basement, extra lot. Cheaper than rent. Lisa Lucht (605)661-4687 800 Burleigh St., Yankton 605-260-0780 www.HomesinYankton.com 2012 Chevy 3/4 Ton Silverado 4X4. 6.0 L, Auto, Keyless Entry, Cruise Control, 124K, Clean Work Turck $14,900 605-665-3720 • Yankton, SD MV Shopper MV Shopper Congratulations M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y In Print and Online! • 665-5884 M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y Career Manufacturing Technical Academy The Yankton Area Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors hosted a ribbon cutting for the Career Manufacturing Technical Academy at their location 1200 W. 21st Street. Yankton School District purchased the RTEC facility, added a large building to the north of the existing building and will continue to offer hands-on learning experiences to their students. Hours are Monday - Thursday: 8am5pm, Friday: 8am – 4pm. They can be contacted at 605-668-5700 or check out their website: www.rtecedu.org.
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