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June 19, 2018 • Page 2 shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com Dave Says By Daris Howard No Obligation Here Dave RAMSEY Step By Step Dear Dave, My father died recently. He walked out of my life 25 years ago when I was a teenager, and he never wanted anything to do with me after that. His brothers, who have already paid for some of his final expenses, asked if I wanted to pay to have his body cremated. They didn’t ask for money, they just offered it as a chance to be part of things. I’m in good shape financially, and I could easily afford the cost. Morally, I wonder if I have a responsibility to help with things. Do you feel I’m obligated in any way? Julie Dear Dave, When is the right time to buy a house when someone is following your Baby Steps plan? Brooklyn Dear Brooklyn, That’s a good question. Let’s start by going over the first few Baby Steps. Baby Step 1 is saving $1,000 for a beginner emergency fund. Baby Step 2 is paying off all consumer debt, from smallest to largest, using the debt snowball. Baby Step 3 is where you increase your emergency fund to the point where you have three to six months of expenses set aside. Once you’ve done all that you can begin saving for a home. I’ll call it Baby Step 3b. For folks looking to buy a house, I advise saving enough money for a down payment of at least 20 percent. I don’t beat people up over mortgage debt, but I do advise them to get a 15-year, fixed rate loan, where the payments are no more than 25 percent of their monthly take-home pay. Doing it this way may take a little more time, and delay your dream of becoming a homeowner a bit, but buying a house when you’re broke is the quickest way I know to turn something that should be a blessing into a burden! — Dave Dear Julie, I’m sorry for your loss. I’m sorry, too, about what happened with your father. I can’t imagine the mixed emotions you must have in your heart. When someone asks me a question like this, I try to put myself in their shoes. Under the circumstances, I don’t think you have any obligation whatsoever — morally or legally — to help pay for anything. If you want to help, and you can afford to do so, then follow your heart. At the same time, I don’t think you should lose one wink of sleep over this if you decide not to contribute. Twenty-five years is long, long time. I don’t know your dad, and I have no clue about his situation or state of mind back then and in the time since. I can’t imagine doing that to a child of any age, though. Do what you feel in your heart is best. But in my opinion, there’s no obligation here. God bless you, Julie. — Dave The first few days of summer vacation were hard on Billy. He was there, at his appointed post – that being the school crossing – at the right time of morning, but look as he may, he couldn’t find any kids. He couldn’t find Martin, either. The perennial crossing guard, with his vest, sign and whistle, was home for the summer. So were the kids. School was out. Billy, being the official town dog since Sally passed away on Doc’s porch, decided on the fourth day of no kids that he might as well do something else. He cruised on down to the Rest of Your Life retirement home and got ear rumples from all the residents there. That’s a * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business, and CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven bestselling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 12 million listeners each week on 575 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com. good way to start summer vacation. Then he dropped over to the Gates of Heaven Chinese Restaurant, and Delbert Chin gave him some scraps out the back door. On his way to the Mule Barn truck stop at the edge of town, Billy came across Dud Campbell, walking slowly and being very quiet. Dud rubbed Billy’s ears, then sat on a low wall. Billy rested his chin on Dud’s leg and looked up at his face in admiration. “Why is it,” Dud asked this big brown dog, “that you always know the right thing to do to help people? I think it’s a gift and you have it.” Billy wagged his tail slowly and kept looking up into Dud’s NEW! face. “You just keep going on, don’t you,” Dud said, “no matter what else happens.” Dud sighed and stood up. “I guess there’s a lesson there for all of us, Billy. Thank you.” Billy continued on toward whatever lunch scraps might be available at the back door to the Mule Barn. Smelled like chicken fried steak from here. Chicken fried steak is good. Any scraps usually has some French fries with it, too. And gravy. Ear rumples, Chinese breakfast, helping a friend, and then cream gravy? Nothing wrong with being the town dog. Save 10¢ Off A Gallon Of Gas When You Use Your Sinclair Card Crown Royal Tex a $ 25.99 750 ML, LimitedsEdMesquite Crown Royal $4 ition 4.99 1. st Prices Be Town! In 75 ML, Includes Apple Colorado Hig 22.99 NEW! Select Cupcake $ Fisheye Wines $ Wines 7.99 750 ML 3.99 750 ML Cork N Bottle We’ll Match All Local Advertising Prices! We’ll M Local Advertis atch All ing Prices! YANKTON CITYWIDE RUMMAGE canopy spoons fire pit rakes vinyl records bike rakes fire pit fire pit household snow blower spoons yard ornaments rakes . nouncing.. An MV Shopper 665-5884 MV Shopper Looking $ 1500 Broadway, 665-3881 I was asked to teach music to the children at the church I attended. The children were from three to twelve, and we called it Primary. I felt very inadequate, but the leader of Primary told me the main thing I needed to do was to love the children. And I did love the children. I loved them as if they were my own and thought of them that way. I was especially fond of one little girl. Millie loved to sing, but she sang monotone. She sang as loud as she could, and though she was only four, she almost matched all of the other children put together. One day, as primary was ending, one of the teachers pulled me aside. “Don’t you think you should see if you can get Millie to sing quieter?” she asked. “Why?” “Well, she sings so, . . . so. . . ” The teacher paused as if she was unable to say it. “She sings so what?” I asked. “She sings so badly,” the teacher said. “I don’t think so,” I replied. “I love to hear her little voice so full of enthusiasm.” “But next week is Fathers’ Day, and you’re having the children sing to their fathers. Don’t you think her father will be embarrassed?” “Not in the least,” I replied. “If Millie were my child, I would be pleased to have her sing with such happiness.” The teacher just rolled her eyes and walked away. I truly did not agree with her. I loved hearing Millie’s monotone voice. It was a happy child’s voice, and when she sang, it lifted my spirit, even if she wasn’t on key. But there was one child I was concerned about. David was eight, and something seemed to bother him. He sang quietly if he sang at all. Usually, he just stared at the floor. But when we sang a song he really liked, he would sing a little and seemed happier. When we practiced the song for the Father’s for the next week, I gathered the children around me. David stood outside the group, staring at the floor. I went and knelt in front of him. “David, I would love to hear you sing. You have such a beautiful voice.” He looked at me with surprise showing in his face. “Do you really think so?” “Yes, I do.” As we continued to practice, David’s whole demeanor changed immediately. He looked up, smiled, and sang every song. The next week, when the children gathered to sing for the fathers, David sang out, though with a little bit of timidity. When we went to primary, I had treats for the children and praised all of them, but gave a little extra praise to David. When church ended, David’s mother came to me. She started to cry but finally was able to speak. “I don’t think you have any idea what you have done for David,” she said. “David used to sing monotone, and a few years ago, when we attended another church congregation, the primary music teacher told him he had a terrible voice and asked him to be quiet. He quit singing altogether. Last week he told us he wouldn’t sing for the fathers today, but after church last week, he happily said he had changed his mind. He told us what you said.” She paused a moment, smiled, and said, “Thank you.” After she left, I pondered about what she said and considered what might have happened to Millie if the teacher had had her way. I thought that God surely loves to hear the smallest child happily sing no matter how monotone or offkey the child is. Millie’s mother eventually signed Millie up with a singing group, and over time, Millie blended better and sang on key. And though I loved to hear her sing with her new expertise, I admit that I missed her enthusiastic little four-year-old monotone voice. And I’m sure her father did, too. M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y and Black 750 ML, Made from Heh Vodka mp & Grains Dining & inment Enterta 84 ANNUAL TH Broasted Chicken & Ham Supper Immaculate Conception Parish Hall CELEBRATION Wednesday, July 4 St. Helena, Neb. Stop By The Press & Dakotan To Place Your Ad OR email ads@yankton.net Serving 4-8 p.m. As Always, Games, Raffle, Bingo & awesome Fireworks to complete the day! A Fun Family Tradition ... Come celebrate with us! Ad Sponsored by Heine Electric & Irrigation CLASSIFIEDS! MV Shopper 319 Walnut St. Yankton, SD 57078 MV Shopper M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y 605-665-5884 Lewis & Clark EL RIAD TEMPLE Presents The 72ND ANNUAL Bring Your Lawn Chairs Or Blankets To Sit On INCLUDES: • • Your ad (30 words, 1 address per ad) placed in the • Citywide Rummage Sale section published July 19th-21st. • • Your ad will also appear on-line at www.yankton.net • • 2 Yard Signs • • by the: Sponsored DEADLINE: 5PM, MONDAY, JULY 16TH for the best deal in town? Check the including a wonderful salad bar, hot vegetable and your favorite selection of pies at the air conditioned JULY 19 ST thru JULY 21 30 words and $.20 per word after 30. ONLY ONE ADDRESS ALLOWED IN EACH AD. In Print and Online! M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y TH All Ads Will Run July 19th, 20th & 21st in the P&D for just $30 Singing to a Father NFAA Easton Yankton Archery Center Field, East Yankton, SD Friday, June 22 1 p.m. & 7 p.m. All concessions will be handled by the Shrine Club and will be reasonably priced.
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