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August 7, 2018 • Page 10 shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com EPA Must Live Up To Its Promise To Provide Certainty To Farmers By Sen. Mike Rounds I recently had the opportunity to question Acting Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler about a number of issues important to our farming community. Particularly, I am concerned about recent action the EPA has taken related to the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) and the impact those actions could have on our corn and ethanol producers. Passed in 2005 and expanded in 2007, the RFS is one of the most significant actions the federal government has taken on behalf of rural America in more than 50 years. It requires transportation fuel in the United States to contain a minimum volume of renewable fuels such as corn ethanol. Administrated by the EPA, compliance is tracked through a Renewable Identification Number (RIN) system and requires a minimum of 15 billion gallons of conventional biofuels, like ethanol, to be blended annually. The RFS has provided the statutory certainty necessary for the corn industry to grow and thrive, and as a result corn ethanol has become a vital component of our nation’s fuel supply. The explosion of corn ethanol production has directly helped our farmers, bolstered American energy independence and created thousands of jobs. However, it was recently reported that the EPA is providing RFS waivers to small refineries, thereby reducing the amount of ethanol required by the RFS and reducing the demand on corn and corn ethanol. During a recent Environment and Public Works (EPW) Committee hearing, I had the opportunity to ask Acting Administrator Wheeler about these waiv- State Historical Society Releases Wilder Autobiography “Pioneer Girl” As E-Book the No. 2 slot on the New York Times PIERRE, S.D.—The South Dakota State Historical Society has released the best-seller list. “It was a surprise success that conpopular “Pioneer Girl: The Annotated Autobiography” as an electronic book. Save $30 on a Summer AC Tune-Up! tinues to fascinate and engage readers,” Tystad Koupal says. “‘Pioneer Girl: The The e-book is part of the society’s PioAnnotated Autobiography’ is the first neer Girl Project. volume to explore in-depth the com“The e-book is the perfect format Just give us a call and and readers on the go,” munities and people the Ingalls famfor researchers we’ll ily knew and the life they lived on the says Nancy Tystad Koupal, director of send out a qualified frontier.” the Pioneer Girl Project and the South ServiceDakota Historical Society Press. “It conTechnician like The e-book is now available at sdhspress.com in both Epub and Mobi tains the numerous annotations, which Tyler, to make sure your formats for $29.95. All State Historical are linked so that the reader can jump AC unitfrom Wilder’s those to the editor’s com- Society e-books, including “Laura Ingalls is ready for words ments and back, along hot summer South Dakota with the illustra- Wilder: A Writer’s Life,” also by Smith Tyler Reiser Hill, can be purchased online at sdhtions, maps and appendices that make days and save $30!* the autobiography so valuable.” Technician spress.com. Service More information about all Pioneer The e-book also allows readers to ac13 years experience Girl Project books and activities can be cess website homepages cited throughfound online at pioneergirlproject.org or out the text with one easy click. In 2015, “Pioneer Girl: The Annotated by calling 605-773-6009. Autobiography” by Laura Ingalls Wilder and edited by Pamela Smith Hill reached When You Want Comfort...You Want Kalins When You Want Comfort… You Want Kalins! Vermillion: 605-624-5618 *Rebate offer only available to Vermillion Light & Power customers. Call for full details. 69 years as a Premier Lennox® Dealer 97 years in the Business 400 years of Heating and Cooling Experience = Your #1 Choice in Yankton! Yankton Vermillion Sioux City 605.665.4348 605.624.5618 712.252.2000 kalinsindoor.com Participating Businesses Are… ers. The agency has not been transparent in their process for granting these waivers, and I was pleased to hear Mr. Wheeler agree to work toward greater transparency, stability and openness moving forward. I also reiterated to Mr. Wheeler the importance of keeping the RFS in effect and honoring our commitment to our corn and ethanol producers. They have invested billions of dollars to create an ethanol industry and it has been a success. Not only has it promoted the production of significant volumes of corn ethanol, corn ethanol has its own unique qualities that are important to our energy marketplace. It is used as an oxygenate in gasoline that is even better than the oxygenates it replaced. It is the best and cheapest octane booster available to the oil industry today. Corn ethanol will also help auto manufactur- ers meet increasing CAFÉ standards, which are regulations in place to improve the average fuel economy. Corn ethanol production is a vital component of the South Dakota economy. The corn ethanol industry supports thousands of jobs in South Dakota and contributes a significant amount of revenue to South Dakota communities. As we move closer to 2022, the year in which the corn ethanol component of the RFS is anticipated to expire, I will continue working with the administration, my colleagues and stakeholders to make certain the federal government continues to live up to its promise to producers and that corn ethanol continues to play an important role in our nation’s fuel supply. Tips To Consider When Stacking And Storing Hay This Season BROOKINGS, S.D. - No matter what materials hay producers choose to bind forage with, the method of storage throughout the summer, into the fall and winter is important to maintaining forage quality, as well as minimizing waste and simultaneously cost of production. To maximize quality and minimize waste, read on to learn some researchbased tips on forage storage put together by Taylor Grussing, SDSU Extension Cow/Calf Field Specialist and Karla Hernandez, SDSU Extension Forages Field Specialist. Factors Affecting Outside Storage Losses Bale Density: With dry hay (moisture at 10-20 percent), the denser the bale, the lower the amount of spoilage. The density of round bales should be a minimum of 10 pounds of hay per cubic foot. Field operations: Uniform swaths, sized to match the recommendations of the baler, will help produce uniform and dense hay bales. Reduce outdoor storage loss with these tips: Outdoor hay storage, increased precipitation results in greater chance for storage losses. Stacking and storage methods noted below can help reduce outside storage loss. Stacking: Bales should be removed from harvest areas as soon as possible in order to allow for uniform regrowth and potentially more cuttings - depending on the forage type. Round bales that are stacked alongside harvest areas should be orientated flat end to flat end, in north and south rows. Stacking east and west will cause deterioration on the north-facing surfaces if not used before next summer. Stacks should be placed in well drained, non-shaded areas to prevent spoilage. It is recommended to leave three feet between rows to provide adequate air flow, sun exposure for drying and reduce excess moisture accumulation. Reduce hay fire danger: If removing hay from the field and stacking in a hay yard, make sure bales are cool and dry to eliminate any potential heating and fire danger. Storage: There are many storage options for hay. The more protected the storage option, typically the greater the expense. However, when penciling out expenses, the price of wasted hay isn't cheap. Depending on how much hay is harvested and used each year, it may be cost effective to improve hay storage methods. What can be done today? Taking current hay prices into account, last year's decreased forage production and future forage needs, storage options may need to be re-evaluated sooner than later. While building a barn may not be realistic this summer, take note of current stacking methods, and see if changes can be made this year to decrease waste. In addition, document current hay inventory (accounting for some waste) and compare this to the winter hay needs of the cowherd. If additional forage needs to be sourced, be sure to purchase quality hay confirmed with a nutrient analysis. Lastly, begin tracking hay waste each year and compare the cost of wasted hay to the cost of improving hay storage on your farm long term. MOODY MOTOR NIOBRARA, NE Patrick Hawk 251 Spruce Ave • Box 260 Niobrara, NE 68760 www.moodymotor.com pjhawk@hotmail.com (402) 857-3711 (800) 745-5650 Fax (402) 857-3713 J&H Cleaning Services YANKTON WORKS Want your REAL-TIME MESSAGE on the most visited media website in the Yankton area? Join our ‘Friends2Follow’ program! Contact your Yankton Media Representative today! 605-665-7811 Now Hiring Herd Co, a progressive Feed Yard in Central Nebraska has the following Job Opportunities: Reuse. Repurpose. Really Save! Take a fresh look at the Classifieds, the original way to shop green! • Assistant Cattle Manager • Mechanic • Mill Maintenance • Feed Truck Drivers • Nightshift Position Competitive Wages. Excellent Benefits. 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