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shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com August 28, 2018 • Page 15 He said that this could have a domino effect in the coming years. “We’re going to see a shift where record labels become less important, and that’s how a lot of bands are funded,” he said. “Without having funds from record labels, that could hurt our industry.” But as with many things, the Internet has also been a curse for music. “Instead of going out to the show, (people) can just stay home,” he said. “For musicians, that’s where we’re making most of our money — from attendance and record sales at shows. We don’t even make that much off of our record sales, we make most of it off of people coming to shows and buying T-shirts and things like that. He added that many festivals, such as the Vans Warped Tour, have had to shut down because of dropping attendance due in large part to people being able to livestream or listen to artists more easily at home. continued from page 14 THE INTERNET It’s near impossible to find a commercial industry or educational institution that hasn’t been touched by the Internet. Music is no exception. Den Herder said that YouTube has become a valuable resource for her classes. “There’s tons of wonderful little video clips you can show them,” she said. “Twenty years ago, it might take you five hours to find that one little piece of information. You can Google it now and have it up in five minutes. We can share that information and share that music with them faster than we could 20 years ago.” Schaeffer said that the Internet has been both a blessing and a curse for music consumption. “Literally, two clicks away, you can listen to any band anywhere,” he said. “It used to be, for a band to get discovered, or to make money, or get their music to somebody, (they) would have to tour to that person’s city, play a show in their town, that person would have to come out to the show and buy a record for them otherwise they wouldn’t have that music in front of them. “There’s more of a chance of a band being discovered without having to go out and do the touring. … You can just be on the Internet and, if the right person comes across you, discovers you or whatever, you can become found.” MUSICAL EXPOSURE It’s hard to find a kid that isn’t at least a little bit familiar with Top 40 radio. As a result, Den Herder said she even finds herself utilizing contemporary music to help with teaching. “(Thursday) we were doing steady beats and trying to get purposeful movement to the beat and feeling the beat with our bucket drumming before we actually took out the drum sticks,” she said. “To get them started, I put on ‘Billie Jean.’ … I’ve found that if you take a popular song, it helps.” Of course, there is a pitfall or two with popular music in a classroom setting. “You have to be careful what popular music you do,” she said. “You have to be very careful on the lyrics. Kidz Bop is not my favorite, but at the same time, it’s been sterilized. You have to have that contemporary music in there to draw their attention for 2-3 minutes.” Den Herder said it’s doubly important to have music classes available for kids in this era. “Kids aren’t exposed to music in the same way they were in the 1960s and ‘70s,” she said. “Most kids would go to church with their parents and they’d be exposed to Sunday School and children’s music. You don’t see that anymore. There isn’t that extra music happening outside of the schools, so it’s our responsibility to expose them to more music because otherwise they may not ever get it.” Den Herder said she makes sure to emphasize the importance music will have on people’s lives. “It’s something you can do all of your life,” she said. “I always tell my kids, ‘I don’t expect all of you to come out of here becoming a musician. But I hope all of you will find an appreciation for music — if that’s becoming a music teacher, going to concerts or playing in the community band.’” She still finds it exciting to keep teaching kids about music. “I am so happy that we have the technology that we have,” she said. “I just find it fun to come in every single day and find new things to try with these kids. It’s a great job to have.” As for Schaeffer, he said that he enjoys the opportunity to keep adding to the music culture in a number of ways. “If I’m not on the road playing music, I’m in here recording bands,” he said. “I definitely stay busy with both. I’m pretty blessed to be able to make music or record music every day.” Follow @RobNielsenPandD on Twitter. ********************************************* Yankton Food for Thought Yankton Food For Thought has gone through a big change this last year but for all of the right reasons. We have become incorporated and officially a 501c3 organization. This change is allowing us to grow and better fill the needs of our participants. Yankton Food For Thought is currently involved with 2 programs that serve Yankton School District children and their families: Sack Pack and School Food Pantry. The Sack Pack program is nearing its 10th Anniversary of serving the Yankton community. Sack packs are packed and delivered to all of the Yankton grade schools, Yankton Middle School, and Headstart on a weekly basis for distribution to the students that are in need of food assistance over the weekend. Over the last school year we provided over 400 packs per week. And through the summer school food program we averaged 70 packs per week from the 3 sites. This program works very well but we know we were missing some families and students in need such as at the high school. Some of the high school students are responsible for their own food bills or know that their family’s budget doesn’t stretch that far. Through a partnership and pilot program with Feeding SD, we found a way to fill a few voids in our hunger needs in the Yankton community, one of them being those high school students. Twice a month, our School Food Pantry provides groceries from 5-7 pm out of a room in Lincoln school. This partnership has helped in many ways including keeping the cost down for the food supplied, providing fruits and vegetables – as much as the family can eat, meat (which is an expensive part of the grocery bill), and just as important a welcoming atmosphere at a time that accommodates their working schedules. All families with children in the Yankton School District are welcome to come on the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays. reduced lunches by a few dollars. This growing group of what we are calling the working poor struggle with a budget to balance that is easily toggled between raises that are quickly offset by benefits that are taken away in a higher rate than the increase in income. Many feel this crunch and are challenged with the costs of the basic need for food. the annual fundraising done by this very supportive group of caring people. We are a United Way funded agency and we also write grants and receive donations directly. The mission of Yankton Food For Thought is to provide food and nutrition education, helping school age children and their families achieve. Join us in filling the needs of the food insecure by following us on Facebook at Yankton Food For Thought. The School Food Pantry has also given us an opportunity to assist with a couple more needs. Some participants may not know how to cook from scratch and some don’t have the kitchen utensils and equipment to make things at home. As of the beginning of this year, we have been able to partner with SDSU Extension Service in Yankton through their Nutrition Assistant that is providing classes before the School Food Pantry opens. With each class we are able to demonstrate food safety and nutritional education, give a useful tool for the kitchen such as a vegetable peeler or meat thermometer, and the participants were able to enjoy a sample of a healthy recipe. Those that took the classes earned a slow cooker by attending the majority of the monthly classes. The future is bright with some possible other drives and distributions that can happen from this location as well. As of right now our board is completely volunteer, so every dollar raised goes directly to food costs. We so appreciate the support of the Yankton community through groups that pack sack packs for the kids during the school year to wonderful people such as the Upper Deck Poker Run fundraising committee that have raised funds for us for 7 years now. This year they came up with a great new raffle called the Supermarket Sweep that the recipient was able to get $769 worth of meat. We look forward to this adding to We are serving over 100 families during the scheduled school food pantry times which equates to helping over 350 people meet their food insecurities. Approximately 1/3 of these participants are from the high school, although we still know that we have many more to reach. The Yankton School District free and reduced rate is currently at 39%, but of that 39% we are only reaching approximately 1/3 in number. And the growing need is the ones that miss the requirements for free and ESTED IN THIS SPOT? -5884 to place your ad here. 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