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October 22, 2019 • Page 2 shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com Dave Says How Can I Help My Mom? Dear Dave, What’s the best way to talk to a parent, and tell them their career or financial choices aren’t working out? My mom and dad divorced a few years ago, and now my mom is having money problems. She bought some rental properties after the divorce with the idea becoming a landlord and generating income that way. Since then, she has lost the properties to foreclosure and isn’t making a lot of Dave money in her new job. I’m worried about her, but I just graduated from college, and I’m afraid she won’t listen to me. Renee RAMSEY Dear Renee, You’ve got a great heart, and I’m glad you love your mom enough to want to help her. Divorce is never an easy thing for anyone involved. I’m guessing you’ve heard sayings at some point in your life about how winners never quit, and quitters never win. Those statements aren’t always completely true. Successful people quit doing things that aren’t working all the time. This doesn’t have to mean you give up on a dream. It might mean you change the processes and methods you’re using—especially if what you’ve done in the past hasn’t worked out well. Part of being successful in life, and in business, is having the ability to recognize when something isn’t working and make changes. You sound like an intelligent, caring young woman. But honestly, there’s probably not much chance someone fresh-out-of-college will have a lot of influence with her mother when it comes to things like this. It might be a good idea if she talked to one of her friends or relatives a little closer to her own age. I mean someone with a little more life experience. If she’s in a good church, she could even talk to her pastor. In the meantime, maybe you could talk to someone like this and explain what your mom is going through. Ask them to approach her, and see if she’ll listen and be willing to accept some new ideas. You’re a good daughter, Renee. Show your mom all the love and support you can. It sounds like she needs it right now. —Dave * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business, and CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven best-selling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 12 million listeners each week on 575 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com. Imaging With a Little Help From My Friends By Richard P. Holm, MD The world of radiology began in 1895 when a European physicist Wilhelm Röntgen noticed fluorescence behind heavy cardboard when a cathode tube was activated nearby. Röntgen used his wife’s hand to demonstrate for the first time how these unknown rays, or X-rays, could penetrate the soft tissue of a hand and illustrate the bones that lay within. Röntgen generously refused to patent his discovery which allowed the explosive growth and development of a new industry. Unfortunately, the first researchers were unaware of the dangers of too much X-ray exposure and, during the early years, harm was done even causing death to some experimenters before safeguards were established. Over time, as technology advanced and more X-rays were being utilized in medicine, interpreting the images became a more difficult challenge and the field of radiology developed. Physicians trained in X-ray INTERPRETATION helped other physicians make better clinical decisions. I was a first-year resident at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta in the fall of 1975 when the hospital purchased one of the earliest computerized tomography (CT) scanners. It was called an EMI scanner named after the British company, Electric and Music Industries, that took the financial risk for developing the technology. Years earlier, EMI had signed with the Beatles as their recording company. Having amassed a fortune from the exponential rise of Beatles popularity, EMI was able to fund the theoretical work of Godfrey Hounsfield. His invention took X-rays of the head from all directions while a computer compiled the results. “With a little help from his friends” at EMI, Hounsfield’s brainchild happened. I was rotating through neurology when the results of the EMI scans started making an impact. We were amazed how they showed tumors, blood clots and lesions inside the skull. We thought it was going to change everything, and indeed it did! Jump to the present and see how INTERPRETIVE radiologists have expanded into INTERVENTION. Now, instead of simply identifying a tumor or abscess with ultrasound, X-ray, CT or MRI, radiologists, under the guidance of an imaging modality, can pass a needle into a deep tumor and take a biopsy, drain an abscess, openup a blocked tube and much more. Procedures that, in the past, would have required open abdominal or chest surgery, now can be done with minimal trauma, with minimal pain and with quick recovery. As a patient who has benefited under the expert image-guided hands of an INTERVENTIONAL radiologist, I too can sing loud and clear, “I get by with a lot of help from my friends.” Richard P. Holm, MD is author of “Life’s Final Season, A Guide for Aging and Dying with Grace” available on Amazon. For free and easy access to the entire Prairie Doc® library, visit www.prairiedoc.org and follow Prairie Doc® on Facebook featuring On Call with the Prairie Doc® a medical Q&A show streaming on Facebook and broadcast on SDPTV most Thursdays at 7 p.m. central. Save 10¢ Off A Gallon Of Gas When You Use Your Sinclair Card Prices Best In Town Captain Morgan Gingerbrea d Spiced Rum ..............................750 ML $ 17.99 Evan Williams 100 Proof Kentucky Bourbon............. 1.75 ML $ 32.99 Skyy Vodka ............................... 1.75 ML $ 21.99 Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Apple.................. 750 ML $ 19.99 Paul Masson Brandy ..... 1.75 ML $ 18.99 Cork N Bottle God’s Children By Daris Howard Rachel’s family had moved west in the 1800s, along with many other pioneers. Life in the rugged land was challenging. Food was often scarce, as were many other important items. But no matter how little they had as a family, Rachel’s father always insisted that if Native Americans came and needed food, that their family would share with them. Rachel had at first detested this, but when her little sister was lost, some Native American men returned the favor and helped find her. That changed Rachel’s attitude about them. Still, in the winter, food was always in short supply, and feeding all those who came by put a strain on the family’s supplies. With her and her siblings, plus their two parents, there were twelve in the family, and it was hard enough just to feed themselves. Sometimes, as the winter wore on, the food was rationed. Though the children usually had all they wanted, Rachel had seen her parents feign lack of hunger when she knew they had eaten almost nothing. One fall, many Native Americans came through as they headed south for the winter. Rachel’s father had worked hard to learn sign language, and he said the Native Americans told him it would be a hard winter. The family put away all the food they could, but it had been a tough year. Some June frosts had blackened the leaves of the potatoes, and the ones that did survive bore a small crop. Rachel saw their already limited food supply dwindling as they continued to feed the Native Americans. She questioned her father about it. “Rachel,” he said, “the Native Americans are God’s children just as we are. If we help take care of God’s children, He will help take care of us.” By November, winter set in, and the snow was deep and almost impassible. As Christmas approached, she heard her parents talking, and her father expressed concern that the food might not hold out until spring. She watched as her parents, especially her father, ate very little each day. If she ever mentioned it, he would pat his belly and say he could do with a little less weight. But she could see him growing thin, and she was concerned. Rachel’s father would go out hunting as much as he could, but the few times he did get anything, it was always only a small rabbit. He said he felt the animals had gone south for the winter, just like the Native Americans had. When the storms were too much for her father to go hunting, he would whittle toys for the children for Christmas. Rachel’s mother would sew dolls and knit clothes from the wool they had taken from their few sheep. Rachel had heard her father say that he might have to butcher the sheep. But he was concerned about what they would use for clothing if he did. A couple of days before Christmas, Rachel heard her father say that come Christmas Eve, he would have no choice. He would have to butcher one of the sheep. But then, on the morning of December 24th, as her father was preparing for the task, Rachel saw someone approaching in the distance. As the person came closer, she could tell it wasn’t one person, but a small group. It took her until they were close to recognize a Native American man she called Skunk Man because of the skunk skin he always wore. But in this cold, he was wearing a thick buffalo hide instead. Rachel ran to get her father, and he came to greet the men. They had two small horses with them, pulling loaded sleighs made from long, straight poles. As her father greeted the men, the family gathered around. Skunk Man signed, and Rachel’s father signed back. Suddenly, Rachel saw tears rolling down her father’s face. He turned to his family. “Our Native American friends were concerned about how much food we shared with them when they came here. They were worried we wouldn’t have enough left for ourselves. They have brought us two deer and half of a buffalo.” That Christmas, as they shared a feast with their Native American friends, Rachel realized that it was true that when you help take care of God’s children, He helps take care of you. SDHCA Dakota MasterWorks Art Show Will Showcase Senior Creative Talents The South Dakota Health Care Association (SDHCA), Legacy, Great Western Bank, and KELO-LAND Television will hold its 23rd Annual SD- 2008 Chevy Silverado LT Z71-4x4, Ext. Cab, 5.3L Auto., Full Power, Has Near New Western 7 1/2’ Power Angle Snow Plow HCA Dakota MasterWorksSM Art Show October 24-25, at the Jerstad Center on the National Good Samaritan Society Campus (Entrance K) located Don’t Wait Snow Is Near Complete Unit For 1500 Broadway, 665-3881 $12,900 605-665-3720 • Yankton, SD Delivering wet grain to town can mean TOO much SHRINK & TOO much drying CHARGE. The most fuel efficient space heater on the market! A Must Have For That Bin Site, Workshop Or Calving Barn! Combine an EconoDri chamber with VAL6 radiant energy to create the same effect as when crops dry naturally on low humidity fall days. So Whether... • Your drying bin equipment is down & you can’t get it repaired • You’re thinking that typical bin drying is taking TOO MUCH PROFIT! • You’d value a multi-use heat/dry system that can serve you at your bin site, shop, calving barn, squeeze chute, mobile repairs & more of Tyndall on Hwy. 50 Corner of Hwys. 50 and 5 miles West www.schuurmansfarmsupply.com 37 Ph. (605) 5 3 89-3909 or Cell (605) 464-111 JOB OPPORTUNITIES at Herd Co Feedlot near Bartlett, NE. General labor starting wage is @ $15.00 per hour. We currently have openings for an Assistant Cattle Manager and a Feed Mill Operator. Also accepting applications for pen riders and yard maintenance. Offering Full Benefits, including Health, Dental and Vision Insurance, Paid Vacation and Sick Leave. Call: 402-482-5931 to request an application and ask for Chad or Galen. at 4800 W 57th Street in Sioux Falls. Art exhibits will be displayed Thursday, October 24th from 3 – 7 PM, with an Awards Reception beginning at 7 PM. The exhibit will reopen Friday, October 25th from 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM. This event is free. We encourage the public to come experience the art talents of our South Dakota seniors age 60+. With a wide variety of entries, there will be something for everyone to enjoy. Whether it is a memory of a farm homestead, a family pet, the smell of a bouquet of flowers, or a scene from the old west, this exhibit is sure to take you back in time! Entrants this year range from ages 60 to 97. The SDHCA Dakota MasterWorksSM Art Show has been recognized with a National Mature Media Award Winner as a top community awareness project acknowledging that the second half of life can be full of creative growth and fulfillment. SDHCA Dakota MasterWorksSM was created to showcase the art talents and creativity of South Dakotans age 60 and older. Corporate sponsors include EmpRes, Good Samaritan Society, Tealwood Senior Living, Westhills Village, Clarkson Health Care, Dow Rummel Village, Tieszen Memorial Home, Jenkins Living Center, Bethany, Grand Living at Lake Lorraine, The Inn on Westport, Sisson Printing, Fischer Rounds & Associates, and Imagery Photography. Contact: 605-339-2071 with any questions regarding the exhibit.
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