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October 30, 2018 • Page 10 shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com New At The Library Here’s what’s new at the Yankton Community Library this week: ADULT BOOKS • Accessory to War by Neil deGrasse Tyson, nonfiction • A Girl’s Guide to Missiles by Karen Piper, nonfiction • Killing the SS by Bill O’Reilly, nonfiction • Mr. Trump’s Wild Ride by Major Garrett, nonfiction • Not That Bad by Roxane Gay, nonfiction • Ambush by James Patterson, fiction • Cherry by Nico Walker, fiction • The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton, fiction • Crudo: A Novel by Olivia Laing, fiction • Cruel Winter by Sheila Connolly, fiction • Dyeing Up Loose Ends by Maggie Sefton, fiction • Holy Ghost by John Sandford, fiction • In His Father’s Footsteps by Danielle Steel, fiction • A Noise Downstairs by Linwood Barclay, fiction • Relic by Alan Dean Foster, fiction • Sometimes I Lie by Alice Feeney, fiction • A Spark of Light by Jodi Picoult, fiction • Those Other Women by Nicola Moriarty, fiction • Time’s Convert by Deborah Harkness, fiction • The View From Here by Lynne Hinton, fiction • Winter in Paradise by Elin Hilderbrand, fiction • Wrecked by Joe Ide, fiction • When We Were Young by Karen Kingsbury, fiction JUNIOR BOOKS • Warriors: Crowfeather’s Trail by Erin Hunter, fiction EASY READING BOOKS • Can a Cat Do That? by Eric Carle • Maybe Something Beautiful by F. Isabel Campoy, fiction • Pete the Cat Goes Camping by James Dean, fiction ——— Did you know that you can reserve an item from home? Staff will then notify you as soon as the item is available! Want your business to be seen? Get your display ad here! Call 605-665-5884 Or Drop By At 319 Walnut St. The Bookworm ‘Simple Things’ Offers Lessons From A Much Different Age “Simple Things: Lessons from the Family Farm” by Jerry Apps; © 2018, Wisconsin Historical Press; 138 pages ——— BY TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER Ropes of diamonds and gold are not for you. A fancy car has no place in your garage, your home isn’t TV-worthy, and you’re happy with uncomplicated meals, hold the mustard. While it’s nice to have big luxuries, you recognize your quieter needs — and as in the new book “Simple Things” by Jerry Apps, you’re grateful for them, too. When Jerry Apps was born on a little farm in rural north-central Wisconsin in the midst of the Great Depression, his parents didn’t enjoy the benefits of electricity or running water. Those things didn’t arrive at the Apps household for many more years, so the family led a simple life with a bounty of goodness. For instance, on the farm, Apps says, one of the first things you learned was to appreciate tools. Different kinds of shovels did different kinds of jobs, and a boy knew he was a man when he had his own three-tined pitchfork. Apps’ dad was never without a pocket knife or pair of pliers, and Apps’ mother had a different kind of tool: her apron, which was towel, hot pad, bucket, and tear-wiper. Today, we notch up a thermostat when the temperature dips but in the Apps household, keeping warm was a complicated task. Apps says his father rose early each day to start fires in the two wood-burning stoves that kept the family warm, putting a bucket of water on one stove to thaw for coffee-making. He then lit a fire in the pump house, one beneath the cattle water tank, one in the “potato cellar,” and then he started barn chores. “Not once did I hear him complain …” says Apps. “It was winter, after all, and that is what you did when you lived on a farm in Waushara County in 1946.” Back then, it was scandalous when one had a messy haystack. Christmas meant two gifts: an article of clothing and a (single) toy. And a radio plus an imagination were all the entertainment a boy needed, except for the stories told on the back porch, at the feed mill, and at the Mercantile on Saturday night… No celebrity gossip. No bumperto-bumper traffic. No bars on windows and deadbolts on doors. No need to imagine: instead, read “Simple Things.” Better yet, read it with someone who was also once a mid-century kid, because author Jerry Apps’ words will lead to conversations you’ll be glad you had and surprise stories you’ve never heard before. Apps is a master at description, so it’s hard not to take a magic feedsack ride back seventy years when reading this book, hard not to hear farm sounds, impossible not to miss your grandparents fiercely. Indeed, this book may be slim, but it’s big on tale-telling and even bigger on nostalgia. You may notice some repetition here and there inside this book but you probably won’t mind a bit. It’s too charming for that; in fact, if you’re a Certain Age or you grew up on a family farm, “Simple Things,” will be a gem. Reporter Warns Rep. Gianforte Not To Lie About 2017 Attack BY MATT VOLZ Associated Press HELENA, Mont. — U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte has intentionally misled voters and the media about his attack on a reporter last year as the Montana Republican campaigns for re-election, the reporter’s attorney said in a letter Thursday. Ben Jacobs’ attorney, Geoffrey Genth, sent a ceaseand-desist letter threatening to cancel Jacob’s agreement not to sue Gianforte if the congressman doesn’t stop. Genth told William Mercer, Gianforte’s attorney, to preserve all documents about the attack in case they are needed as evidence. “Please advise your client that he and his spokespersons need to stop — immediately and forever — telling lies about the assault, about their own prior lies, about your client’s ‘settlement agreement’ with Ben, or about any other aspect of this matter,” Genth wrote. Gianforte spokesman Travis Hall did not have an immediate comment on the letter. Genth declined to comment, saying the letter speaks for itself. The attack against Jacobs has re-emerged as a campaign issue for Gianforte, who is defending his seat against Democratic challenger Kathleen Williams. Williams recently released an ad with audio of the scuffle from Jacobs’ recorder, with the ad saying, “This is not who we are.” President Donald Trump also praised Gianforte for the attack during a rally last week in Missoula. “Any guy that can do a body slam — he’s my kind of guy,” the president said. Gianforte pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault after throwing Jacobs to the ground when the reporter tried to ask him a question the day before the special congressional election Gianforte won in 2017 to complete the term of Ryan Zinke, who was named Interior Department secretary. Jacobs agreed not to sue after Gianforte donated $50,000 to the Committee to Protect Journalists and wrote a letter acknowledging that Jacobs didn’t initiate the attack. Gianforte initially told police that Jacobs attacked him first, and his campaign initially released a statement repeating that Jacobs was the aggressor. Gianforte told the editorial board of the Missoulian newspaper that he recounted to police what he remembered about the assault — that Jacobs attacked him first — and that he was bound by the settlement agreement not to talk about the assault, the newspaper reported earlier this week. Those comments led to Genth’s letter. Gianforte’s remarks aim to conceal his responsibility for the attack and his dishonesty about it, Genth wrote. There also is no confidentiality provision in the agreement and nothing keeping Gianforte from answering questions about This past year a nursery barn was constructed for baby pigs. This small barn fell into Yankton County Class F for Confined Animal Feeding Operation. Class F is for operations that have 1-299 Animal Units. The Quality of Life for South Dakota group was not happy this man built his barn, and 33 people are currently in a lawsuit against the County and farmers because they feel Class F operations should be required to apply for a Conditional Use Permit (CUP). If they win this suit, everyone in Yankton County with 1-299 animal units will be required to get this permit. Any operation, no matter the size, is considered an Animal Feeding Operation if their livestock are confined without vegetation for 45 days out of 12 months. Living in South Dakota, we are required to confine our livestock during the winter to provide them with adequate shelter and food. It is basically impossible to find vegetation from November-April in Yankton County. At the current time, no operations would be grandfathered in. This would be very detrimental to our livestock producers. Applying for this CUP would take 6-8 weeks, and cost the livestock producer and the YC Zoning Commission a lot of time and money. This would cause detrimental harm to programs such as 4-H and FFA because it would force parents to apply for a special permit for their child to have an animal to show. Imagine being a 13-year-old girl and having to sell your horse because your parents could not get a permit. Imagine being a 9-year-old, excited to show your first calf in 4-H just to find out you cannot get one. My fiancé and I recently purchased our first farm which sits on just over 26 acres, and he decided to purchase 26 chickens. Over the summer he hatched 11 eggs, so now we have 37 chickens. Our property is surrounded by CRP, and there are a lot of coyotes and other predictors around. We keep the chickens in the barn at night so they do not get eaten. If this lawsuit goes in favor of the plaintiffs, I would be required to get a CUP for these chickens because they are equal to or greater than 1 Animal Unit. Our land is zoned as agricultural, and now they want me to apply for a permit just to have a few chickens on our farm?!? Hobby Farmers can have 1 animal for each acre they own. But, Hobby Farmers are those in Residential Districts of Yankton County. Anyone in an Agriculture District in Yankton County is not considered a Hobby Farmer. It seems backwards that the plaintiffs believe it is acceptable for Hobby Farmers to raise livestock on land that is zoned as Residential, yet they have an issue with Farmers raising livestock on land that is zoned as Agricultural. This is not a fight against ‘Factory Farms’ as the plaintiffs claim. This would harm everyone involved in agriculture in Yankton County, big or small. Dan Klimisch, Joe Healy, and Cheri Loest all believe a Conditional Use Permit should have been required for this operation. Something like this would destroy agriculture in our County. Most of you are not farmers and do not think this will affect you. But, agriculture is Yankton County's #1 industry and produces $395 million for our county annually. Many businesses in our community rely on ag, and this affects each and every one of us. Agriculture is about everyone who works at the following local businesses: manufacturing facilities such as Wilson, Schurco, Baldwin Filters, and Manitou, grocery stores, restaurants, banks, accountants, agronomists, insurance agencies, grain elevators, implement dealers, auto stores, service stations, fuel stations, repair shops, part stores, auto supply stores, seed dealers, herbicide and pesticide applicators, tire stores, veterinarians, trucking companies, well services, fencing services, propane companies, farm supply stores, hardware stores, concrete plants, gravel plants, feed stores, feed mills, contractors, carpenters, electricians, sale barns, processing plants, extension agents, and many more. It is amazing how many people agriculture affects in our community. All of these people need services such as schools, health care, homes, and retail stores which helps our entire economy. It is easy to see agriculture is the heartbeat of our community. We have to protect our local economy, businesses, and farmers. Voting for Todd Woods, Ray Epp, and Deb Bodenstedt is the only way to do this. Jessica Goeken Paid for by Jessica Goeken the attack and his statement to police, the lawyer added. “By way of his new falsehood about the ‘settlement agreement,’ Rep. Gianforte intended, during the last weeks before a contested election, to mislead the press and the electorate about his ability to respond to questions relevant to his candidacy,” Genth wrote. The renewed attention on Gianforte’s attack comes with absentee voting underway in Montana. Carroll College political science professor Jeremy Johnson said the president didn’t do Gianforte any favors by bringing it up last week. The reminder could influence independent and swing voters in the race. “It’s now become another argument that Williams can use to make her case,” Johnson said. Williams said Thursday that Montana voters should be having conversations about health care, Social Security and rural issues — but instead find themselves talking about an assault by a congressman. “Montanans can do so much better,” Williams said. “Frankly, this is not behavior becoming of a U.S. representative.” Check out the for great specials at your local restaurants! In Print and Online! Hartington Tree LLC TREE TRIMMING, REMOVALS & TRANSPLANTING TREES FOR SALE EVERGREEN • SHADE • ORNAMENTAL Yankton 605-260-1490 Hartington 402-254-6710 The right job is just one click away. www.missourivalleyshopper.com Serving Southeast SD & Northeast NE for 20 Years Kent & Kyle Hochstein • Licensed Arborists www.hartingtontree.com In Print and Online! Call 665-5884 th 90 10 BIG DAYS ~ STARTING TODAY SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 10TH STORE-WIDE SALE Sofas, Recliners, Dining Room Sets, Entertainment Centers, Sleepers, FireplaceUnits, Pictures, Lamps, Grills, Bedroom Sets, Curios, Appliances, ect. HUGE MATTRESS SALE Buy Any Scott Living Queen Set and Receive 100% Comfort Guarantee AND $100 OFF/Set Queen Mattresses Starting at $199 Queen Sets Starting at $329 Smidt Furniture, Flooring & Appliance Serving southeastern South Dakota since 1928 911 East 6th St., Freeman, S.D. • 605-925-4904
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