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September 25, 2018 • Page 10 shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com Health Department Investigates Legionnaires’ Disease Increase Radical Suffragist Matilda Joslyn Gage Is Remembered In New Biography PIERRE, S.D.— At this month’s South Dakota PIERRE, SD – The South Dakota Depart- sources that may contain the Legionella Festival of Books in Brookment of Health is investigating 14 conbacteria. However, it is often the case that ings, Sept. 20-23, the South firmed cases of Legionnaires’ disease that a single source may not be found.” Dakota State Historical Sohave been reported in people who reside In addition to case investigations and ciety will release a young or traveled to Sioux Falls. All 14 cases environmental assessments, CDC will be adult biography about were hospitalized and 1 died. The paassisting the Department to provide an one of the many forgotten tients are ages 36-80 years, with a median education program for businesses on the heroines of the women’s age of 57 years. proper maintenance and operation of suffrage movement. South Dakota typically sees between cooling towers, hot tubs and other water In “Born Criminal: Ma8 and 15 case reports of Legionnaires’ features. The Sioux Falls Health Departtilda Joslyn Gage, Radical disease each year. As of Sept. 20, 24 cases ment will be coordinating outreach to Suffragist,” author Angelhave been reported in the state this year, local businesses. ica Shirley Carpenter exmirroring a national increase in cases. “As with past public health concerns, plores Gage’s life and why The Department continues to conduct inwe are ready to assist the South Dakota she is often overlooked depth interviews with patients to identify State Department of Health investigate when her comrades, Susan potential exposures and has notified Legionella cases and to help identify B. Anthony and Elizabeth healthcare providers in Sioux Falls of the opportunities to reduce risk to this comCady Stanton, are regularly increase in cases to aid in prompt diagno- munity,” said Sioux Falls Public Health celebrated. sis and treatment. Director Jill Franken. Reflecting upon her Occurring more frequently in hot Legionnaires’ disease is a type of 1893 arrest, Gage said, humid weather, Legionnaires’ disease is pneumonia caused by Legionella bacteria. “All of the crimes which I spread by inhaling the fine spray from Most people exposed to Legionella bactewas not guilty of rushed water sources containing Legionella ria don’t develop Legionnaires’ disease. through my mind, but I bacteria. It is not spread person to person People over the age of 50, smokers or failed to remember that or by consuming drinking water. Cases of those with certain medical conditions, I was a born criminal—a Legionnaires’ disease have been associincluding weakened immune systems, woman.” What was Gage’s ated with cooling towers (part of large chronic lung disease or other chronic crime? Registering to vote. air conditioning systems), decorative health conditions are at increased risk “This is an exciting fountains or hot tubs in other states. for Legionnaires’ disease. Symptoms first look at a woman who “The Department has requested asinclude muscle aches, chills, shortness of changed the course of sistance from the Centers for Disease breath, headache, fatigue, loss of appetite United States history,” Control and Prevention (CDC) to provide and coughing. These symptoms may be says Nancy Tystad Koupal, additional resources to help us invesfollowed by high fever and pneumonia. director of the South tigate this increase in cases,” said Dr. Individuals experiencing these symptoms Dakota Historical Society Joshua Clayton, state epidemiologist. “In should see their healthcare provider. Press. “With more than addition to enhanced case investigations, For more information visit: http://doh. 100 photographs and adCDC will assist us with environmental sd.gov/news/legionnaires.aspx ditional materials for readassessments and testing to identify water ers, it is the first volume in the Historical Society Press’s Suffrage Project, Need people to find which celebrates votes for your business? women and the centennial anniversaries being held Get your display ad here! nationwide.” M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y Prior to 1920, most women in the United States had no voice in www.missourivalleyshopper.com who created laws or set 665-5884 their taxes, and they were arrested when they did attempt to cast ballots. By the mid-1800s, Matilda Joslyn Gage (1826–1898), and others like her, thought it was time for change. Gage grew up in New York state in a home on the Underground Railroad, and her early introduction to the movement to abolish slavery made her value all people. When three of her grown children moved to Dakota Territory in the 1880s, Gage took the woman suffrage cause west, traveling from town to town on the frontier, promoting her ideals. At the dedication of the Statue of Liberty in 1886, she helped stage a protest, arguing that a woman could not represent liberty in a country where women were not guaranteed the right to vote. Gage’s ideas were not always popular, and others often viewed her as too radical. Stanton and Anthony, prominent leaders in the suffrage cause, both outlived Matilda Gage and eliminated her from their own histories of the women’s movement. By the time the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution granted women nationwide the right to vote, Matilda Gage was all but forgotten—until now. “Carpenter’s book is a strong reminder that history is written by the victors. ‘Born Criminal’ is an inspirational portrait of a woman who never gave up the fight for equality; her message could not be more timely or more necessary,” writes May Alexice in “Foreword Reviews” magazine. In South Dakota, women won the right to vote in 1918. Many minority women here and elsewhere, however, were not allowed to vote until after 1920. Carpenter has master’s degrees in education and library science from the University of Illinois. She served as director of the Palm Springs, Fla., Public Library and worked for the Arne Nixon Center for the Study of Children’s Literature at California State University, Fresno. Carpenter currently resides in Fresno and is active in the International Wizard of Oz Club, the Lewis Carroll Society of North America and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. “Born Criminal” is available for $19.95, plus shipping and tax and can be ordered directly from the South Dakota Historical Society Press at sdhspress. com or by calling 605- 7736009. For more information about the Suffrage Project, call 605-773-6003. Follow the South Dakota Historical Society Press on Facebook (SDHS Press) and Twitter (@sdhspress) for more. MV Shopper MV Shopper SD Army National Guard Names M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y Check out the for great specials at your local restaurants! Save $30 on a Summer AC In Print and Online! Tune-Up! Just give us a call and we’ll send out a qualified Service Technician like Tyler, to make sure your AC unit is ready for those hot summer South Dakota days and save $30!* Soldier, NCO Of The Year By Staff Sgt. Austin Pearce 129th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment RAPID CITY, S.D. - The South Dakota Army National Guard selected six enlisted Soldiers and seven non-commissioned officers to compete in the state's Best Warrior Competition in Rapid City and Sturgis, Sept. 7-9, to identify the next Soldier and Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year, respectively. After the three-day competition, Staff Sgt. Cory Cody, of White Owl, and a member with the 211th Engineer Company, was named the SDARNG's Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year. Pfc. Nicholas Rios, of Rapid City, and a member with the Headquarters Company, Tyler Reiser Service Technician 13 years experience 109th Regional Support Group, was named the SDARNG Soldier of the Year. "The significance of this Best Warrior Competition is because of the dynamic world that we live in today," said State Command Sgt. Maj. James Hoekman, the SDNG's senior enlisted leader. "We are now changing our philosophy on how we fight and it's going to be a more near-peer enemy and with that, brings demands of more individual training for our Soldiers. "This competition is based on that individual posture where they're doing individual training on warrior tasks, lifesaving tasks, CBRNE (chemical, MOODY When You Want Comfort...You Want Kalins When You Want Comfort… You Want Kalins! MOTOR NIOBRARA, NE Vermillion: 605-624-5618 *Rebate offer only available to Vermillion Light & Power customers. Patrick Hawk Call for full details. 69 years as a Premier Lennox® Dealer 97 years in the Business 400 years of Heating and Cooling Experience = Your #1 Choice in Yankton! biological, radiological, nuclear and/or explosive) tasks, and weapons qualification and familiarization - all the basic wartasks needed for an individual Soldier to protect themselves in combat." The BWC challenges the competitors academically, technically, physically and mentally. "I feel very proud of myself," said Rios. "I represented my unit at the highest standard possible and made my family proud as well." This year's competition was changed to mirror the intensity that the Soldiers may face the regional and national level competitions. The timing of the state competition was 251 Spruce Ave • Box 260 Niobrara, NE 68760 www.moodymotor.com pjhawk@hotmail.com (402) 857-3711 (800) 745-5650 Fax (402) 857-3713 Yankton Vermillion Sioux City 605.665.4348 605.624.5618 712.252.2000 kalinsindoor.com EEDvEeD S RIERpersNn be deli er d R CA ca Low MiLes and Shop ouri Valleyen Tuesday mornings Miss twe anytime beys by 6:00pm. 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"Bailey Ruff won nationals last year for Soldier of the Year and it shows our Soldiers in South Dakota that they can compete with anybody in the nation - in the National Guard, the Reserve or in the active Army component - and that they can win against that competition." Cody and Rios will advance to the Region 6 Best Warrior Competition scheduled to be held in North Dakota, spring 2019, where they'll face competitors from Alaska, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming. At regionals, they will be tested on a variety of skill sets, which can include warrior tasks and battle drills, written essays, uniforms and appearance, drill and ceremony, land navigation and map reading, first aid, weapon systems, physical fitness and general Army knowledge. "It is extremely humbling to be chosen to represent each and every NCO in the state," said Cody. "This is a task I am more than willing to take on for the South Dakota National Guard the best I can." The NCO of the Year runnerup/alternate was Sgt. Daniel Ward, 129th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, and the Soldier of the Year runner-up/ alternate was Spc. Rylie Fleckenstein, Alpha Battery, 1/147th Field Artillery Battalion. The competition and the training involved to prepare for it provides the competitors not only with the opportunity to improve themselves, but to improve their peers and subordinates as well. "The competition was definitely difficult; there's a wide variety of subjects and physical activities and it certainly pushes a Soldier to the limits and hopefully beyond the limits that they've already set for themselves," said Cody. "As an NCO, you try to take experiences and learning points from any event that you go to in the military and that allows you to take that knowledge and improve the way that you train your Soldiers."
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