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September 11, 2018 • Page 10 shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com Mom & SDSU Extension Professional Offers Tips League Of Women Voters For Healthy Afterschool Snacks And Activities Hosts Forum Sept. 11 BROOKINGS, S.D. - As her girls start fourth grade and kindergarten this fall, SDSU Extension Early Childhood Field Specialist Audrey Rider says she is working to pre-make easy and nutritious after school snacks to hold them over until dinnertime, as well as prepare some fun activities to keep them busy while they wait for her to get home from work. "I could go buy the boxed snacks, like fruit snacks and chips, but I want them to get more of their essential nutrients from this snack and be able to eat supper when I get home from work and not be filled up on empty calories," Rider explains. "Eating healthy is a life habit we can help our children develop early on." So, she did some of her own online research and found no-recipeneeded ideas to pre-make and have waiting for her girls after school. Below she shares some of the easy snack ideas she found on the Food Network website. • Unsweetened applesauce • Dehydrated fruits and vegetables (tomatoes, peas, corn, bananas, apples, mangoes, vegetable blends) • Rice cakes topped with light vegetable cream cheese • Low-fat granola with low-fat milk • Toasted whole wheat pita triangles with light herbed cheese • Cucumber boats filled with partskim ricotta cheese and Parmesan cheese • Dried figs stuffed with light strawberry cream cheese • Watermelon wedges dipped in low-fat vanilla yogurt • Baked corn chips with fat-free black bean dip or warmed vegetarian refried beans • Baby carrots, bell pepper strips, celery sticks and zucchini sticks dipped in hummus • Sliced apples with cubed cheddar cheese • Cubed cantaloupe, honeydew and watermelon • Dried fruit (raisins, cranberries, cherries, mangoes, pineapple, apricots, and blueberries) mixed with nuts (almonds, cashews, peanuts, pistachios, pecans, walnuts) • Whole wheat pretzel sticks dipped in nut butter • Graham cracker sandwiches made with hazelnut spread • Whole grain, low-sugar cereal with low-fat milk • Guacamole with baked tortilla chips • Whole grain crackers with lowfat cottage cheese and sliced (oil packed) sundried tomatoes Non-tech activities Rider also wanted her daughters to have some non-screen related activities they can do once their homework is done. "I encourage parents to think about the things their children like to do and then create an activity box or area where the kids can easily access items that will keep them entertained and exercise their imagination," she says. Below she shares some of her daughters' favorite activities. • Box of Legos to build their own inventions/structures • Art supply box with various paints, brushes, colors, coloring books etc. (I picked up most items at dollar stores) • Flashcards to practice • Sidewalk chalk for creations outside (if weather and space allow) • Slime making materials (if you don't mind a little bit of mess when you get home from work) Lakota Homes Garden Produces Fresh Vegetables & Grows Community By Lura Roti for SDSU Extension/iGrow.org BROOKINGS, S.D. - This year Katherine Montague's garden didn't produce much. "The radishes didn't like the heat and the watermelons didn't like the soil," Montague explains. But, that didn't keep the 57-year-old Lakota Homes resident from eating fresh vegetables. "My neighbors shared cucumbers, zucchini and eggplant. I feel the community garden helps me eat healthier because when someone gives you fresh vegetables, or if you grow them, you cook them," says Montague, who cut up the cucumber to make a cucumber and onion salad like her mom used to make and utilized the zucchini and eggplant to enhance homemade soups. Her experiences with generous neighbors and garden produce are some of the reasons the Lakota Homes neighborhood asked SDSU Extension to help them establish a community garden in 2016, says Prairey Walkling, SDSU Extension Family & Community Health Field Specialist. "We're working with communities to help provide accessible and affordable fruits and vegetables. The Lakota Homes Board expressed interest in having a community garden to provide healthy and affordable vegetables as well as a place within the community to gather," Walkling says. "It's our hope that this garden becomes a positive place for residents to gather into the future." Following direction from the Lakota Homes Board, SDSU Extension staff and neighborhood volunteers tilled up a garden spot in the neighborhood commons. Lakota Homes Oyate Community Garden season 1 went OK, but Walkling and the Lakota Homes Board began to see that due to the age of the gardening residents, raised beds would be much more comfortable and make weeding and harvesting easier. Neighbors were also asking for a fence. "There are a lot of kids playing ball and running around in the area where the garden is. So, we needed a fence to protect the plants and keep the deer and rabbits out," explains Delores Allen, a retiree who loves to garden and enjoys the community aspect of a communal gar- dening space. "Although I know most of my neighbors, we end up visiting more when we are in the garden." To help fund materials, labor and gardening soil to construct a raised bed garden and fence, Walkling wrote and received a $2,000 grant from Farm Credit Services of AmericaWorking Here Fund which funds projects that make a positive impact in Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming. The project also received grant dollars from the South Dakota Master Gardener Earl Dailey Memorial Endowment Grant. Walkling also reached out to Scull Construction Service, a locally-owned business known for their generosity. "We donated labor and materials because they asked us," says Mike Jubie, director of business development. "We've been in this community for 33 years and giving back is a core value of our company." Jubie worked with another local company, Knecht Home Center, and was able to purchase materials at a reduced rate. Jim Scull also teamed up with Hani Shaffi of Dream Design to donate an additional $1,700 necessary to complete the project. Employees from Scull Construction volunteered their time to build 12 raised beds measuring 4-foot-by-8-foot and a fence tall enough to keep deer out. "It's always good to give back to the Native American community," explains Casey Cuny, a project engineer for Scull Construction and a member of the Oglala Lakota Tribe. Enthusiastic neighbors began planting vegetables in raised beds even before the project was complete. "This garden has become a special place for this community. We are going to continue to support this project as they ask for our involvement," Walkling says. "Piece-by-piece, yearby-year, we are working toward the goal." Montague says the community garden makes her proud of her neighborhood. "HUD housing is designed to lift people and help them lead better and enhanced lives. That's what this garden does, it enhances our lives." To learn more about how SDSU Extension can work with you to enhance your community, visit iGrow.org or contact Prairey Walkling. As Election Day draws closer, voters across the country ask “Will my vote count?” The League of Women Voters is trying to answer that question. The League of Women Voters of Southeast South Dakota is hosting an educational forum on legislative redistricting Wednesday, Sept. 11 at 5 p.m. USD Political Science Professor Julia Hellwege will speak on gerrymandering at “Will Your Vote Count?” at Farber Hall on the USD campus. “Gerrymandering is the process of manipulating voting district boundaries to benefit one particular group, party or candidate,” Hellwege said. “As such, those in charge of drawing the lines – the mapmakers and deciders – have tremendous influence on whether your vote will actually count.” League of Women Voters of South Dakota received a $10,000 grant from the national league to hold comprehensive public education forums on legislative redistricting. Nine events will take place across the state in the next three months. The forums are intended to increase voters’ knowledge and understanding of redistricting, how redistricting affects elections and alternatives to the current process. The 2020 census will track population changes over the last 10 years and have a major impact on how legislative districts are redrawn in South Dakota. Currently, the state legislature draws those lines. In 2016, South Dakotans voted on a constitutional amendment which would have removed that power from the legislature and given it to a nine-member independent commission consisting of three Republican voters, three Democrat voters and three voters not affiliated with either of the two parties. That amendment was defeated, 57 percent to 43 percent. A 2005 federal court case in South Dakota, Bone Shirt v. Nelson, forced the state to redraw district lines in the southwest part of the state. Two cases recently before the Supreme Court, from Wisconsin and Maryland, were sent back to the states for further attempts at redistricting. The cases drew claims of gerrymandering from both Republicans and Democrats. Hellwege is an assistant professor of political science at USD. Her research focuses on institutional behavior and representation, in particular in relation to gender, race and ethnicity. She received her Ph.D. and M.A. in political science from the University of New Mexico and her bachelor’s degree from Colorado Mesa University. September Recognized As Campus Fire Safety Month in SD PIERRE, S.D. – Gov. Dennis Daugaard has proclaimed September as “Campus Fire Safety Month” in South Dakota. The designation highlights the fact that fatal campusrelated housing fires can happen. With students now back at college, State Fire Marshal Paul Merriman says this is a good time to remind students to be prepared no matter where they live. “Many college students have not received fire safety education since elementary school and they do not realize how quickly a fire can occur either in on-campus or off-campus housing,” says the Fire Marshal. “The issue of campus fire safety has become more of an important topic as more schools and communities understand the need to keep college-age students safe.” Fire Marshal Merriman says fatal campus or off campus housing fires are similar to others found in homes. The fires could be started by any number of things such as heaters, people smoking, electrical malfunctions or food left too long cooking on the stove. “All of these fires can be dangerous and deadly no matter where they start,” says the Fire Marshal. “This is an ongoing effort to educate the future generation of our state about the importance of fire safety behavior so these behaviors can help to ensure their safety during their college years. Fire Safety is a life skill.” The State Fire Marshal’s Office is part of the South Dakota Department of Public Safety. Help Wanted Full time cow/calf & feed lot operation help. Experience with equipment, feed lot and calving helpful but not required. Call 402-256-9353 Leave a message MV Shopper MV Shopper M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y Book 66 Fill the puzzle so that every row, every column, and every section contain the numbers 1-9 withoutRrepeating a number. 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