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April 12, 2018 • Page 12 shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com Spring Home Improvement & Car Care Safety Measures For Teen Drivers Young adults gain independence through a series of milestones throughout their youth. But few such milestones are more anxiously anticipated than the day when teenagers earn their drivers’ licenses. For teenagers, drivers’ licenses mean the difference between being at the mercy of adults for transportation and being able to set off on their own. Even though a license to drive indicates a teen has passed the written and road tests necessary to drive without adults present, newly minted licensed drivers may still not be ready to drive without supervision. In fact, statistics indicate that teenagers may benefit from a little extra instruction and guidance before they’re given the keys to the family car. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among American teens. According to State Farm, young Canadians represent only 13 percent of the licensed driving population, but account for approximately 20 percent of the motor vehicle-related deaths and injuries across the country. The highest per-driver and per-distance fatality rates are found among drivers between the ages of 16 and 19. According to Geico, one in five 16-year-old drivers has an accident in their first year of driving. Teenagers who want to drive and stay safe on the road can employ these safety tips. • Keep an open attitude. Consider increasing road time under the instruction of an adult and learn from their guidance. Ask for help if there is a driving skill you haven’t mastered, such as merging onto a busy highway or parallel parking. • Limit other teen passengers. The CDC says the presence of teen passengers increases unsupervised teen drivers’ crash risk. Until you are secure behind the wheel, avoid the temptation to give a bunch of friends a ride. • Stick to daylight driving. Geico says the risk of a fatal crash is three times greater at night for every mile driven. Reduced visibility and reaction time can contribute to crashes. Gain ample experience driving during daytime hours and make sure you are completely comfortable behind the wheel before setting out at night. • Practice in all conditions. Safe driving involves making smart decisions even when driving conditions are poor. With an adult in the passenger seat, practice driving in inclement weather, only venturing Teen drivers have an elevated crash risk. out in such conditions on your own when you feel ready to do so. • Turn your phone off. Smartphones put all motorists at risk of accident. In the time it takes drivers to look at incoming texts, they may have driven several hundred feet without their eyes on the road. Make it a policy to turn smartphones off while driving. • Slow down. Speed is a common factor in automotive crashes involving teens. Follow posted speed limits at all times. • Drive unimpaired. Do not take drugs or consume alcohol or other substances that impair your ability to drive. Teens can stay safe behind the wheel by playing it smart. nMetro Creative Connections Carbon Monoxide Remediation Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas that can be deadly. Because carbon monoxide is found in the fumes produced when fuel is burned, it is present in and around homes. As a result, homeowners should be aware of carbon monoxide and make every effort to detect its presence. CO forms most readily when there is insufficient oxygen to complete combustion and produce carbon dioxide. Hot water closets, furnaces in crawlspaces, heating appliances in attics, and other contained areas are common areas where CO can form. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that thousands of people visit emergency rooms and are hospitalized because of CO poisoning every year. While CO is a risk for just about anyone, infants, the elderly, those with breathing problems or chronic heart disease, and people with anemia are most likely to get sick from CO. CO has earned the moniker “the silent killer” because it cannot be identified without the presence of a carbon monoxide detector. If a person believes he or she is smelling carbon monoxide, that person is probably mistaking the odor for other combustion byproducts that the human nose can sense. CO is a byproduct of vehicle exhaust, boat engines, stoves, lanterns, grills, furnaces, and fireplaces. CO is produced anytime something is burning. That is why it is essential that products designed to be used outdoors are used exclusively outside, and that indoor appliances are properly vented to the outdoors. CO can build up indoors and poison people and pets who breathe it in. Some people may not recognize that CO is problematic in a home until multiple residents start complaining of similar symptoms. Common CO poisoning symptoms include nausea and vomiting, dizziness, chest pain, confusion, headache, and other flu-like symptoms, advises the consumer advocacy Ferdig’s Transmissions & Exhaust Locally Owned & Operated group Carbon Monoxide Kills. Those with repeated exposure to high levels of CO may eventually develop cerebral edema, which is a swelling of the brain. CO can compress brain cells and destroy them, leading to neurological issues and death. CO poisoning is actually the result of the head and heart not receiving sufficient oxygen. CO detectors can save lives and should be installed in all homes and apartments. The National Fire Protection Association says CO detectors “shall be centrally located outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms.” Individuals should follow the manufacturer instructions regarding where on the wall or ceiling the CO detectors should be mounted. As an added safety precaution, CO detectors should be placed on every floor of the home. Gas sensors in CO alarms have limited life spans, so they should be replaced generally every five to six years, because calibrating and testing for CO is more difficult than simply replacing the alarms. Installing or replacing carbon monoxide detectors is an easy improvement that can help save lives. nMetro Creative Connections Over 50 Years Experience in the Yankton area! Your One-Stop Shop For Complete Automotive Repair! •Foreign • Standard • Clutches •Domestic • Automatic •Batteries Auto Body & Collision Repair • Free Estimates & Loaner Car Auto Glass Replacement “Caring for our customers and their cars” JASON ORR Now Offering A/C Recharging and Repair! Wayne Buss - Cy Hohbach - Casey Lecher OWNER/OPERATOR 605.665.9012 220 East 3rd St., Yankton INSURED CALL OR TEXT: 605.760.3680 YANKTONWINDOWCLEANING@GMAIL.COM Call Kalins Indoor Comfort for an AC Precision Tune-Up! AC Tune-Ups should be done by a Kalins Licensed Technician... Why? • We have over 95 years in the business • Tune-Ups prevent costly breakdowns • Tune-Ups extend the life of your equipment • We service all makes and models 605-665-7069 2004 Locust - YANKTON M-F: 8-5 We work with all insurance providers A Variety of Beautiful Flooring Options Just In Time For Spring! • Carpet • Vinyl • Tile • Wood • Laminate Bob Bierle Service Technician Over 20 Years of Experience When You Want Comfort…You Want Kalins! Vermillion: 888.871.2635 • Yankton: 888.409.8094 • Sioux City: 888.706.4544 kalinsindoor.com en Carpet Lars Sales & Installation 208 Walnut Historic Downtown Yankton 605.665.2067 Serving Yankton And The Surrounding Communities For Over 40 Years
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