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shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com Dave Says Business Issues and Family Dear Dave, My father-in-law started a business as an LLC few years ago. He named all his daughters owners, with him owning the majority share. The business failed, and now he is being sued by creditors. He told the family these creditors can’t come after us and the other siblings, because he is the majority owner. Is this true, or should we get a lawyer? Caleb Dear Caleb, Your wife is probably not in danger, Dave unless she signed paperwork making her liable for a loan or liable with a creditor. If she signed official, legal paperwork – like if she went down to the bank and signed on a loan – then she’s liable. It’s that simple. That would make her, or any of her siblings who did this, co-makers on the loan. Your wife, and any of her sisters, who signed on trade accounts taking supplies from a supplier and paying them could also be liable. But they are not automatically liable simply because they were listed as minority owners in an LLC, or even a sub-S corporation. If it were a general partnership, there’s a possibility they could be liable. That’s one of the reasons I hate general partnerships. I hate partnerships in general, but I hate general partnerships, too! In other words, I think you’re okay. I would still advise speaking with an attorney, and giving him or her all the details of this situation, to be absolutely certain. — Dave RAMSEY A Fast Sled By Daris Howard I had nine brothers and sisters, and there wasn’t a lot of We cashed in an annuity the other day because things have been tight, and we were wondering if we should use it to help continue money for new things. But living on a farm with that many siblings meant we found ways of having fun that didn’t cost a paying down debt, or simply live on it until things get better. lot. One was with an old commercial chicken building on our Vernon Dear Vernon, You need to be honorable and pay your debts, but that may have to be put on hold for a while. Right now, it’s more important to have food in the house and keep the heat on. If you haven’t done so already, contact your creditors and explain the situation. Let them know you’ll make things right with them as soon as possible. I know this is a scary situation, especially around the holidays, so make sure you two pull together and keep the lines of communication wide open. A few extra hugs wouldn’t hurt, either. The good news is it sounds like things may be looking up. Support your wife all you can in her new job, and make sure you continue looking for work, too. A little extra money is better than none, so take on something part-time while you’re looking for a permanent position. God bless you two! — Dave * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business, and CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven bestselling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 12 million listeners each week on 575 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com. Be There for Each Other, and Don’t Give Up! Dear Dave, My wife and I both lost our jobs a few weeks ago. She began a training course for a new job last week, and I’ve been interviewing. Highway 50 Project Moving Forward farm that had a low ground floor and a steep roof. The snow in the winter was always high enough that it packed up to the roof. The snow also covered the roof. This created a perfect sledding slope. We didn’t have money for sleds, but that didn’t stop us. We found that the scoop shovels that we used to shovel grain would work. These were plentiful on our farm. We would sit on the shovel with the handle to the front. We would put our feet out front along the handle, or if we were really good at balancing, we could put our feet up on the handle and lean back. I started sledding down this roof by the time I was five years old. I never saw any other sled until the time I was ten. I had joined the cub scouts, and we were going to the sand hills. I showed up carrying my scoop shovel. “What’s that?” Rod said with disgust. “It’s a scoop shovel,” I replied. “I can see that,” Rod replied. “But why did you bring it sledding?” I thought everyone used a scoop shovel for sledding, so I thought it was a dumb question. By this time, all of the other boys had gathered around. “This is what we use for sledding,” I said. Rod rolled his eyes. “That’s the dumbest thing I ever heard.” I looked at the sleds the other boys were carrying. There was no one else with a scoop shovel. Theirs actually were sleds. Rod’s was especially nice. It was a round saucer with curled up edges. We loaded into our cub scout leader’s suburban and headed to the sledding hill. All of the way there, the other boys continued to mock my scoop shovel. “Where do you usually go sledding with your shovel?” Lenny asked. I explained about the chicken building roof. They all laughed and said it was stupid. When we got to the sledding hill, we hurried to the top. I quickly learned how nice the other boys’ sleds were. They climbed on them and zipped down the hill. They didn’t have to worry about balancing to not tip over. And even though my scoop worked well as a sled, it had far more drag. I only went about half as far as they did. They let me try their sleds, and I grew very unsatisfied with my scoop shovel. My mother had volunteered to make hot chocolate for us, so our Cub Scout leader was taking us to my house. I was deeply considering how I could get a sled, when Rod mockingly said, “Maybe when we get to your house, we should try your sledding roof with a real sled.” The boys all thought that was a good idea. So once we arrived at my home, while my mother prepared the hot chocolate, we boys headed out to the sledding roof. We climbed to the top, and I went down first to show them how I used the scoop shovel. When I got back to the top, Rod said, “Now watch what a real sled will do.” He jumped on his sled, and when he reached the spot where I had stopped, he was still moving at high speed. One thing I hadn’t thought about was that the big manure pit where the wet manure drained was in that direction. It was covered with a thin layer of snow. I never worried about it because my shovel sled wouldn’t go that far. But Rod’s took him on top of it. He stopped, and turned to me and laughed. “See what a good sled will do?” He then stepped off of his sled and immediately dropped up to his neck in wet manure. As the other boys gasped, I decided my scoop shovel sled was a good one after all. “I can’t stand winter,” said Herb Collins, who had dropped in at the Mule Barn’s philosophy counter for a quick cup. “There’s nothing to do.” “Get out and enjoy it,” suggested Doc. “Go skiing. Go ice fishing. Build a snowman. Do something. Then you’ll feel better.” PIERRE, S.D. – The planning phase of a project to recon“I don’t think your advice will take,” said Dud. “Herb struct portions of Highway 50 between Tyndall and Tabor seems to be intransigent on this one.” has been completed according to the South Dakota DepartWe all looked at Dud. ment of Transportation. “You see, he said he couldn’t stand winter,” Dud continThis section of Highway 50 has seen an above average ued, “which shows he has a proclivity for intransigence on number of crashes, including serious injury crashes, over that particular subject.” the past 12 years. We looked at him some more. Several public meetings have been held over the past few “If he were to take up a winter hobby,” he continued, “he years and comments received have helped to shape the plan could stop being intransigent and enjoy things more.” Even Herb was staring at him now. for the proposed reconstruction. “I usually,” said Herb, “enjoy a proclivity in that direcThe department was originally planning to eliminate all four-lane sections on Highway 50 from the Highway 37 north tion, but winter is pretty boring, so maybe I really should be intransigent on this point.” junction east through Tabor. The newly modified plan will “Well Herb,” said Dud, “even though you might have a retain the four-lane section at the Highway 37 north junction proclivity this season for being intransigent on your attitude (to Mitchell) and also includes constructing two passing about winter, you could kinda ease up and consider a hoblanes along the rural portion of Highway 50. by. That way you’d be showing a proclivity for transigence.” The remaining four-lane sections will be reduced to two “Transigence?” said Doc. “I thought those were people lanes with a center turn lane at four locations; one at Tabor, who lived under bridges. You might want to look that one one at the intersection with Highway 25 and two near Tynup, Dud.” dall. Right turn lanes will be added at many of the affected inDud blushed as we laughed. tersections and will address concerns for vehicles slowing to “Say Dud?” said Steve, the cowboy. “Wasn’t proclivity turn right. The plan also calls for straightening some curves, last month’s word?” improving sight distances and potential speed reductions. “Yes,” said Dud, “and I believe I’ve used it a couple of “The amount of public participation in this project has dozen times already.” been impressive and as we look to meet our mission to ef“And now this month’s word is intransigence, right?” ficiently provide a safe and effective transportation system, Dud nodded. it’s essential to invest in safety improvements and plan for “Well then,” said Doc, “it looks like you are going to have the future”, says Mike Behm, director of Planning and Engia proclivity for saying intransigence this month. That’s a neering. “Two lanes with a center turn lane through these veritable plethora of proclivity my friend.” Dud pulled out a pencil and grabbed a napkin. sections will provide more consistent speeds and greatly “How do you spell it, Doc?” decrease the risk of high speed intersection crashes.” Pierre, S.D. – The South Dakota Department of Revenue’s motor “Spell what?” Additional information on the project along with a map of vehicle division will reissue its exempt entity and tribal license “Plethora.” the construction area can found at: http://www.sddot.com/ plates in 2018. We just groaned. Sometimes education can be ugly. dot/publicmeetings/pubmeet_SD50Tyndall.aspx Exempt entity plate holders can renew their annual vehicle reg- Exempt Entity, Tribal License st Prices Be Town! In We’ll Match All Local Advertising Prices! Lord Calve $ rt 15.99 1.75 ML Black Velve $ t Toasted Carme l 19.99 1.75 M L Fireball $1 3.99 750 ML Botabox $1 6. 99 3 Liter Box W ine Cork N Bottle 1500 Broadway, 665-3881 istrations after Jan. 1, 2018, to receive the new plates. The exempt entity plate reissue will be the first of its kind since 2007. Exempt entity plates are generally designated for vehicles owned by federal, state, tribal, county and municipal governments, but are also used for public schools, non-profits, SE Hatchback, 14K..$11,500 mass-transit vehicles and fire Classic LT, 34K.......$14,900 departments. The tribal license plates are , AWD, 67K..........$14,950 also being reissued in 2018, but ,Ext. cab 4x4.........$16,900 the reissue does not include , 3/4T ,4X4.......$15,600 the Cheyenne River Sioux tribal plate and all tribal veteran , Moon roof........$10,000 plates that were released July , Ext. cab.............$6,500 1, 2017. The tribal license , Reg. cab............$3,700 available to all South plates are Dakotans, and may be obtained via your local county treasurer’s office, online at http://mysdcars. sd.gov or at any self-service terminal located around the state. Ready for Winter Dining & Entertainment In the Open To The Public Pancakeast Breakf $ Sunday, Jan. 7th Pancakes, Eggs, Bacon, Sausage, Biscuits & Gravy, French Toast
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