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December 19, 2017 • Page 10 shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com Cover Crops – Another Tool Apply For S.D. Sheep Growers In The Conservation Toolbox Association Grant By Bill Smith Resource Conservation and Forestry Division Director Sustainability—it’s a word many people in and around the agricultural world have been hearing a lot lately. But what does sustainability mean and how can it be implemented? Sustainability can be defined, in the environmental science sense, as “the quality of not being harmful to the environment or depleting natural resources, and thereby supporting long-term ecological balance.” Many producers across South Dakota are taking steps each and every day to ensure their operation is sustainable today and into the future. One measure some South Dakotans are implementing is including cover crops in their crop rotation. Cover crops are unharvested crops, such as flax or radishes, grown as part of a planned rotation that provide benefits to the soil, most importantly by feeding microbes within the soil. Keeping living roots in the soil (before and after harvest) provides soil microbes with the habitat they need to thrive. Those microbes, in turn, provide nutrients and protection for crops harvested from that soil. Many people take soil for granted and view it as a static feature on the landscape. What few people realize is that soils are a complex combination of air, water, organic and mineral matter. Until fairly recently, many people never gave much thought to how soil microbes could have an impact on the productivity and sustainability of a soil. What we know now is that soils are alive and by keeping the soil microbes healthy, we get more productive soils to grow the food, fiber and fuel that make our modern society possible. Along with providing a healthy habitat for plants to thrive, cover crops also offer many different benefits. These include protecting the soil against water and wind erosion, suppressing weeds, reducing soil compaction and providing supplemental forages for livestock. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture has resources and information available through their website (nrcs.usda. gov) or their local service centers. I would strongly recommend any producer looking to add cover crops to their rotation talk with their local NRCS team about what options would best help them reach their operational goals and possible assistance that may be available. Where do you see your farm in ten years? Maybe even in twenty, thirty or forty years? Sustainability is all about taking care of what we have now and preparing it for the future. Cover crops can be one tool to help you have a sustainable operation for years to come. Health Department Urges Vaccination As Flu Activity Increases PIERRE, S.D. – People should not delay getting a flu shot now that flu activity is increasing in South Dakota. So far this season, South Dakota has reported 146 laboratory-confirmed cases and 26 flurelated hospitalizations. The best way to prevent getting sick with influenza is to receive a dose of influenza vaccine. “It’s not too late to get vaccinated,” said Dr. Joshua Clayton, state epidemiologist for the Department of Health. “It takes about two weeks after getting a flu shot for your body to build protection against the flu, so get vaccinated now to protect you and your loved ones.” Annual flu vaccination is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older. Groups like pregnant women, children younger than 5 years, people over 65 years and people with chronic medical conditions are at higher risk for flu-related complications, such as pneumonia, hospitalization, and death. Healthcare workers and household contacts of high-risk populations, such as those with young infants, should also be vaccinated. Influenza is a viral infection spread by respiratory droplets released when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Common signs and symptoms of the flu include fever of 100 degrees or greater, cough, sore throat, headache, fatigue, body or muscle aches, and runny or stuffy nose. In addition to vaccination, to prevent the spread of the flu: • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use alcohol-based hand gel; • Cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze; • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth; and, • Stay home if you are sick. Learn more at http://flu.sd.gov MV Shopper MV Shopper M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y In Print and Online! 665-5884 M I S S O U R I VA L L E Y Thank You to our wonderful Customers and Employees. May you all have a Merry Christmas and a Happy Holidays! YANKTON FREEMAN WAGNER MITCHELL 665-3762 925-4241 384-4580 996-6633 BROOKINGS, S.D. - The South Dakota Sheep Growers Association has established a travel grant fund to assist young producers interested in attending the American Sheep Industry Association's annual convention held January 31- February 3, 2018 in San Antonio, Texas. "We urge young producers to consider this unique opportunity to attend the American Sheep Industry Association's Annual Convention," said David Ollila, SDSU Extension Sheep Field Specialist. "It is a great opportunity to connect with fellow sheep industry stakeholders from across the nation." The S.D. Sheep Growers Association raised $2,800in a roll over auction during their 79th annual convention to support the attendance of younger sheep producers to the ASI Annual Convention. Based on the number of eligible candidates, the association will divide the dollars (limited to $750/operation) among the eligible young entrepreneurs attending. To apply for the travel grant funds, young producers must meet the following eligibility requirements: 1. Applicant be between 18 and 45 years of age; 2. Applicant is a paid member of the South Dakota Sheep Growers Association; 3. Applicant is actively producing and/ or feeding sheep in South Dakota; and 4. Applicant has interest in becoming a lifelong sheep producer and/or lamb feeder. To apply, contact Dave Ollila, SDSU Extension Sheep Field Specialist at 605-5690224 or david.ollila@sdstate.edu. Deadline to apply is January 5, 2018. Grants will be announced January 6, 2018. Additionally, the American Sheep Industry Association is discounting the registration fee $200 for Young Entrepreneurs who are S.D. Sheep Growers Association members. American Sheep Industry Association staff have planned an exciting convention with many educational, informational and networking sessions that will provide a better understanding of the opportunities for young producers in the sheep industry. Everyone who attends is sure to return with enthusiasm and a positive perspective for a future in the sheep industry. To learn more about the convention, visit the American Sheep Industry Association website. To become a South Dakota Sheep Growers Association member, please contact SDSGA Treasurer, Tammy Basel by email or call Tammy at 605.985.5205. To learn more, visit the South Dakota Sheep Growers Association's website to find contact information for the Director for your region. South Dakota 4-H And Global Cultures BROOKINGS, S.D. - As she prepares for her senior year, South Dakota 4-Her, Shelby Hinkle is getting ready to expand her global perspective by traveling to Japan and living with a host family for a month. "I am really interested in Japanese culture and want to experience what life is like in a foreign country," explains the 17-year-old Holabird native. Hinkle was first exposed to Japanese culture when her family hosted Natsuki, a 14-year-old youth from Japan, two summers ago as part of the States' 4-H International Exchange Program. Hinkle will travel to Japan through this same program. With a mission to enhance youth's world understanding and increase global citizenship through international, cultural immersion, States' 4-H International Exchange Program has been orchestrating exchanges for middle and high school 4-H youth since 1972. "Especially in today's world, young people can greatly benefit from gaining a global perspective. They need to understand what is happening throughout the world in order to enhance their mutual understanding and acceptance of other cul- tures," says Yoko Kawaguchi, President and CEO of States' 4-H International Exchange Program. Since partnering with the organization in 1979, South Dakota 4-H has hosted about 650 delegates from Japan, Costa Rica, Norway and Finland. Through the decades, 30 South Dakota 4-H members, like Hinkle, have traveled abroad through States' 4-H International exchanges. Hinkle's older sister, Brittany, first introduced the family to the program when she traveled to Costa Rica for a month-long exchange. The sister's mom, Kristi, says after Brittany returned, she was sold on the program and the value it provides to South Dakota youth. "The experience helped her grow up quite a bit. The experience really brought her out of her shell and four weeks away from her parents was a good step toward maturity," Kristi says. In fact, Kristi was so impressed by the program, that when previous coordinator asked her to take over the position she didn't hesitate. "I enjoy seeing how much the youth change after living in a different country for a month," says Kristi, who is a 4-H leader and the owner of Let Our Family Business Keep Yours In The Go With: • Farm Filters • Hydraulic Hoses • Bearings & Seals Cox Auto 1007 Broadway Ave Yankton, SD 605•665•4494 New Beginnings Greenhouse in Highmore. Although serving as coordinator of South Dakota's States' 4-H International program is not a fulltime job, the role comes with a lot of responsibility. Kristi locates and vets qualifying host families, host orientations and trainings and helps outbound youth and families through the application process. Each year, South Dakota needs about 15 host families. Kristi and South Dakota's States' 4-H International program was recently recognized with the Outstanding Quality Program Award. "Kristi has a great excitement and passion for this program. Her new ideas and energy have helped the program grow in South Dakota," Kawaguchi says. To learn more about how you can become involved in South Dakota's States' 4-H International program, as a 4-H youth or host family, contact Kristi Hinkle at 605.852.2298 or e-mail her by email. More about South Dakota 4-H SDSU Extension's 4-H Youth Development Program is a partnership of federal (USDA), state (Land Grant University), and county resources through youth outreach activities of SDSU Extension. Youth learn and experience Leadership, Health and Wellness, Science and Ag-Vocacy through a network of professional staff and volunteers reaching more than 9,000 enrolled members with yearly programming efforts to an additional 35,000 youth participants. t 3 ??????3K??3&??????3?3???Ž???? , 3 ????3,Ž?????? ! ew Year N Happy and a Yankton • 605-665-4348 Vermillion • 605-624-5618 www.kalinsindoor.com When You Want Comfort, You Want Kalins! ^ 3 ??3h?3&Ž?34??3 z 3 Ž??3/????????3E???? ^ 3 ??????3???34???3^????3???? ? 3 Ž???3'???????3/?????3t?????? 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